Susan Lindquist: MCB Distinguished Lecturer

On October 3 at noon in the CLSL Auditorium (B102), the School of MCB sponsored a distinguished lecturer seminar by Susan Lindquist, PhD. Dr. Lindquist earned a bachelor's degree in microbiology from Illinois in 1971. She received the University of Illinois Alumni Achievement Award in 2006 and presented the Albert and Ellen Grass Lecture, Protein Folding and Misfolding in Neurobiology, at the 2007 Society for Neuroscience meeting.

Dr. Lindquist, the first female director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, is also a member of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and is on the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her October 3 lecture was on The Surprising Biology of Prion Proteins.

MCB Distinguished Lecturer Series

On October 3 at noon in the CLSL Auditorium (B102), the School of MCB sponsored a distinguished lecturer seminar by Susan Lindquist, PhD. Dr. Lindquist earned a bachelor's degree in microbiology from Illinois in 1971. She received the University of Illinois Alumni Achievement Award in 2006 and presented the Albert and Ellen Grass Lecture, Protein Folding and Misfolding in Neurobiology, at the 2007 Society for Neuroscience meeting. Dr. Lindquist, the first female director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, is also a member of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and is on the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her October 3 lecture was on The Surprising Biology of Prion Proteins.

Dr. Lindquist was an Ada Doisy Lecturer in Biochemistry in 2003-4, where she was introduced as, "one of the major contributors to our understanding of the functional consequences of protein folding and misfolding, and the roles of chaperone proteins in protein maturation and assembly." A recent U of I news article about Dr. Lindquist stated, "The molecular biologist is known for her bold and creative thinking, her drive to integrate research among several disciplines and, as one scientist described it, "the elegance and diversity of her experimental approaches." Lindquist’s research centers on how the incorrect folding of proteins can be inherited and result in such disorders as cystic fibrosis and Alzheimer’s disease. Among her many honors, she was selected as one of the Top 50 Most Important Women in Sciences by Discover Magazine."

October 25, 2007 All News