News Archive

2006

Bird Song

David Clayton, professor of cell and developmental biology, and other researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that "a protein known primarily for its role in killing cells also plays a part in memory formation."

News Bureau article     
Posted December 20, 2006
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Ten professors at Illinois elected as 2006 Fellows

Akria Chiba, associate professor of cell and developmental biology, and of entomology, and Mark E. Nelson, professor of molecular and integrative physiology, biophysics, bioengineering and neuroscience, are two of ten faculty members at the U. of I. to have been have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

News Bureau article     
Posted November 27, 2006
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Cloning techniques produce FDA-approved antibiotic

A study published in Chemistry and Biology by Huimin Zhao, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and affiliate of the Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology and Wilfred A. van der Donk, professor of chemistry and affiliate of the Department of Biochemistry, concludes that fosfomycin, a phosphoric acid compound, provides researchers and clinicians with the potential for developing new treatments for bacterial infections.

News Bureau article     
Posted November 27, 2006
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Dipstick test

Yi Lu, professor of chemistry and affiliate of the Department of Biochemistry has developed a simple "dipstick" test for detecting cocaine and other drugs in saliva, urine or blood serum. "Building upon our earlier work with lead (Pb) sensors, we constructed colorimetric sensors that are based on the lateral flow separation of aptamer-linked nanostructures," Lu said.

News Bureau article     
Posted November 13, 2006
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Lantibiotics

In a study funded by the National Institutes of Health, Wilfred van der Donk, professor of chemistry and affiliate of the Department of Biochemistry, and colleagues were able to identify lantibiotics, "a class of very potent antimicrobial compounds," that may hold important implications for the treatment of microbial infections.

News Bureau article     
Posted October 30, 2006
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Honey Bee Chemoreceptors

Hugh M. Robertson, professor of entomology and of cell and developmental biology, and postdoctoral research associate, Kevin W. Wanner, report the finding of a family of honey bee chemoreceptors that deals with smell and taste. "'This moves us an important step closer to understanding the molecular details of how bees, and insects in general, smell,' Robertson said."

News Bureau article     
Posted October 25, 2006
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Honey Bees

Researchers led by Gene Robinson, professor of integrative biology, entomology, and cell and developmental biology have accomplished the sequencing of the honey bee genome. "In biology and biomedicine, honey bees are used to study many diverse areas, including allergic disease, development, gerontology, neuroscience, social behavior and venom toxicology," Robinson said.

News Bureau article
News Bureau Inside Illinois pdf spread     
Posted October 25, 2006
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Honeybee Behavior

In a study of the honey bee genome funded by the National Science Foundation, researchers including Gene Robinson, professor of integrative biology, entomology, and cell and developmental biology, "have come a step closer to understanding the molecular basis of social behavior in humans."

News Bureau article     
Posted October 23, 2006
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Campus welcomes new faculty/staff members

Inside Illinois continues its tradition of introducing some of the new faculty members on campus. Rachel J. Whitaker, assistant professor of microbiology, is just one of many "New Faces" of 2006.

News Bureau article     
Posted October 05, 2006
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Dr. Rutilio Fratti joins the biochemistry faculty

Since arriving in Urbana-Champaign from his post-doc at Dartmouth Medical School, Dr. Rudy Fratti is anxious to begin his work on membrane microdomain assembly and membrane fusion. Posted October 01, 2006
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Robert B. Gennis awarded an honorary doctorate

The Faculty of Natural Sciences of Stockholm University made the award to Professor Gennis in a ceremony held at City Hall in Stockholm, Sweden. The award was for achievements in the area of Bioenergetics. Posted September 29, 2006
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Gating Mechanism

Emad Tajkhorshid assistant professor of biochemistry, pharmacology, and biophysics, and colleagues published a paper this week that sheds light on the mechanism behind gating in membrane channels.

News Bureau article     
Posted September 21, 2006
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Governor funds stem cell research grants

Fei Wang, professor of cell and developmental biology in the School of Molecular and Cellular Biology will receive $400,000 for research to provide new tools for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying human embryonic stem cell fate determination for tissue repair and regeneration.

UI News Bureau     
Posted September 07, 2006
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From Plastics to Nanoscience: the second chemical revolution

"On September 6 2006, biochemist Eric Jakobsson...gave a brief introduction and led a discussion on 'From Plastics to Nanoscience: the second chemical revolution'."

cu-cafe-sci.org article     
Posted September 06, 2006
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Nanodisc technology sets sights on advancing cellular function

In a recent paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Stephen Sligar and his collaborators report on using nanodiscs to control the oligomerization state of proteins. Sligar is a member of the biochemistry faculty and is in the 3-D-Micro and Nanosystems group at the Beckman Institute. The abstract is online.

NIH     
Posted September 01, 2006
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One protein, two channels: scientists explain mechanism in aquaporins

Emad Tajkhorshid and colleagues at the University of Arizona Using have identified a key component of the gating mechanism in aquaporins that controls both the passage of water and the conduction of ions. Tajkhorshid is a member of the biochemistry faculty.

UI News Bureau     
Posted September 21, 2006
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Synthetic Molecules

Paul J. Hergenrother, affiliate of the Department of Biochemistry, co-authored a paper this week in Nature Chemical Biology. The study, funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the U. of I., discovered a new technique to activate apoptosis in cancer cells.

UI News Bureau     
Posted August 28, 2006
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A cup of coffee and a slice of science

"Abigail Salyers, a professor of microbiology, spoke about the relationship between humans and the microbial world recently at CU Café Sci, a monthly forum at the Verde Café in downtown Champaign. The event is based on the international concept called Café Scientifique, informal gatherings where experts lead discussions about scientific topics. For more information and a schedule of upcoming speakers, visit www.cu-cafe-sci.org."

cu-cafe-sci.org article
UI News Bureau     
Posted August 17, 2006
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Planarian Stem Cells

Phillip A. Newmark, professor of cell and developmental biology, has found a novel way to study stem cell generation. In a paper to be published in Developmental Cell this month, Newmark and other researchers show how planarians use stem cells to regenerate.

UI News Bureau     
Posted August 07, 2006
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Critical research initiatives receive recognition, funding

The Vice Chancellor for Research's Critical Research Initiatives program will sponsor six projects this year. Of those six, co-principal investigators Wilfred van der Donk, professor of chemistry and affiliate of the Department of Biochemistry and William Metcalf, professor of microbiology, have been selected to receive seed funding for a project entitled "Discovery, Design and Development of Phosphonic Acid Antibiotics."

UI News Bureau     
Posted August 03, 2006
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Emad Tajkhorshid joins the biochemistry faculty

Dr. Takjkhorshid came to Illinois after earning his Ph.D. at the University of Heidelberg. Posted August 01, 2006
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Synthetic molecular causes cancer cells to self-destruct

"'We have identified a small, synthetic compound that directly activates procaspase-3 and induces apoptosis,' said Paul J. Hergenrother, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry and corresponding author of a paper published by the journal Nature Chemical Biology. 'By bypassing the broken pathway, we can use the cells' own machinery to destroy themselves.'"

UI News Bureau     
Posted August 28, 2006
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U. of I. microbiologist Carl Woese elected to Royal Society

"Microbiologist Carl Woese of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has been elected as a foreign member of the Royal Society, the world's oldest continuously active scientific academy in the world."

UI News Bureau     
Posted May 19, 2006
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Lu rated No. 3 in Top 5 Hot Talks/Cool Papers

Last month in San Francisco, five presentations and publications were ranked as the Top 5 hot Talks/Cool Papers of the Materials Research Society's spring meeting. U. of I.'s Yi Lu was among them. Lu, a professor of chemistry and affiliate of the Department of Biochemistry, was named number three with his paper "Detecting Poisons Using DNA and Nanoparticles."

UI News Bureau     
Posted May 18, 2006
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Research involving adult stem cells receives state grants

Stephen J. Kaufman was awarded a state grant last week for his research on stem cells. "Kaufman, a professor of cell and developmental biology and member of the university's neuroscience program, — received $250,000 to focus on mesoangioblasts adult stem cells that have the capacity to become skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells, as well as nerve cells. It is hoped that they could be used to repair a variety of diseased tissues, especially for muscle-related diseases and injuries."

UI News Bureau     
Posted May 04, 2006
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Paul J. Hergenrother

Paul J. Hergenrother, affiliate of the Department of Biochemistry, was awarded the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award for 2006. "The award, administered by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, supports the teaching and research careers of young faculty members in the chemical sciences. Criteria for selection include an independent body of scholarship and a commitment to education that signals the promise of continuing outstanding contributions to both research and teaching.")

UI News Bureau     
Posted May 04, 2006
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UI researcher named Fellow of American Academy of Arts and Sciences

William T. Greenough was named a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on April 24. His research has crossed across the disciplines and he holds multiple faculty appointments. He is a Swanlund Endowed Chair, director of the university's Center for Advanced Study and a professor in the departments of psychology, cell and developmental biology, and psychiatry (College of Medicine)

UI News Bureau     
Posted April 24, 2006
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Frog Communication

In a study to be published this week in Nature, Albert S. Feng, professor of molecular and integrative physiology, reports on the first documented case of a rare frog (Amolops tormotus) that is able to communicate like bats, whales and dolphins.

UI News Bureau     
Posted March 15, 2006
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Virus Simulation

Klaus Schulten, professor of physics, chemistry, and biophysics and computational biology, and colleagues this week presented the first computer simulation of an entire life form, a virus. The full study will appear in the March issue of the journal Structure.

UI News Bureau     
Posted March 14, 2006
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Nisin engineered in test tube

Professors Satish Nair and Wilfred A. van der Donk report in the journal Science on the synthesis of the powerful antibiotic nisin-a, a natural product used to preserve food. Their work sheds light on antibiotic resistance.

Chemical and Engineering News
UIUC News Bureau
Abstract     
Posted March 09, 2006
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Achievements

Benita S. Katzenellenbogen, Swanlund Professor of molecular and integrative physiology and cell and developmental biology and Center for Advanced Study Professor, and John A. Katzenellenbogen, Swanlund Professor of Chemistry, have been selected to jointly receive the Roy O. Greep Lecture Award for 2006 from The Endocrine Society.

UI News Bureau     
Posted February 16, 2006
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Blood Clots

James H. Morrissey, a biochemist, and colleagues at the University of Georgia have discovered that a linear polymer known as polyphosphate speeds blood clotting and helps clots last longer.

UI News Bureau     
Posted January 19, 2006
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Infertility Gene

In work to appear this week on the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences website, Milan Bagchi, professor of molecular and integrative physiology showed that a specific transcription factor must be present in the uterus of mice in order for pregnancy to occur. "'This protein in the mouse is also in humans,' Bagchi said. 'We believe it plays a critical role in human pregnancy.'"

UI News Bureau     
Posted January 17, 2006
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Pox Protein

In a study funded by the National Institutes of Health, Joanna L. Shisler, assistant professor of microbiology, and other researchers report the finding of a protein that could lead to treatment for inflammatory responses such as occur in rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease.

UI News Bureau     
Posted January 11, 2006
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Polymer aids in blood clotting, pointing way to new treatment

Professor Jim Morrissey, department of biochemistry and college of medicine, teamed up with researchers from the University of Georgia and report on "a linear polymer that speeds blood clotting and helps clots last longer." Their paper appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

UI News Bureau     
Posted January 09, 2006
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