News Archive

2007

The Queen Bee

In a study published in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers led by Gene Robinson, professor of integrative biology, entomology, and cell and developmental biology, reveal why the queen honey bee lives 10 times longer than her genetically identical, but sterile sister worker bees.

Science Daily article
Innovations Report article     
Posted May 09, 2007
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MCB Open House

This spring's student-hosted MCB Open House was a hit in its third year. MCB undergraduates showed the community how "cool" biology can be.

LAS News article     
Posted May 03, 2007
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Antibiotic research

William W. Metcalf and collaborators at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Wisconsin will receive a $7 million award from the National Institutes of Health 'to discover, engineer and produce a promising - yet little explored - class of antibiotic agents."

Medical News Today article
Innovations Report article     
Posted April 29, 2007
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Honey bee genome holds secret to colony collapse

Gene Robinson, professor of integrative biology, entomology, and cell and developmental biology, and colleagues, are working to find particularly active genes in collapsing honey bee colonies in efforts to identify potential stressors effecting the colonies.

Chronicle Herald article     
Posted April 28, 2007
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Honey bee colonies collapse

Gene Robinson, professor of integrative biology, entomology, and cell and developmental biology comments on the disappearance of honey bees from colonies across the nation

Suntimes article
News-Sentinel article
New York Times article
New Scientist article     
Posted April 25, 2007
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Planarian research sheds light on germ cell formation

"In a study published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U. of I. cell and developmental biology professor Phillip Newmark and colleagues report that the tiny flatworms called planarians share some important characteristics with mammals that may help scientists tease out the mechanisms by which germ cells are formed and maintained."

News Bureau article
Innovations Report article
EarthTimes.org article
HULIQ.com
PhysOrg.com article
Science Daily article
United Press International article     
Posted April 24, 2007
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Brain Awareness Day: an opportunity to think

"Sponsored by the UI Neuroscience Program and School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, the annual "Brain Awareness Day," the local version of a national Society for Neuroscience program, is all about the organ you use for thinking."

News Gazette article     
Posted April 23, 2007
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Treating Brain Disorders

William Greenough, professor of cell and developmental biology, and psychology and psychiatry, debates the the treatment of brain disorders, proposing that computer-based techniques, though advanced in technology, may are not always the best option over low-tech solutions like surveys and medicines.

Nature article     
Posted March 27, 2007
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Nobel Laureate Paul C. Lauterbur, developer of MRI, dies at age 77

Paul C. Lauterbur, considered by many to be the father of MRI, died this morning, at age 77. Lauterbur won the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for introducing gradients into a magnetic field that allow for two-dimensional pictures of internal structures. He is survived by his wife, Joan Dawson, his three children, and his first wife.

News Bureau article     
Posted March 27, 2007
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Entomology: The Scientist

Gene Robinson, professor of integrative biology, entomology, and cell and developmental biology, comments on the importance of findings reported by an article published this week in Public Library of Science Biology. According to the article, "a gene involved in egg production also helps honeybees exhibit some crucial social behaviors that distinguish them from solitary insects. 'This technique promises to be extremely helpful in identifying the no-doubt many other genes involved in regulating division of labor,' Robinson predicted."

The Scientist article     
Posted March 06, 2007
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Illinois professor to be inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame

Paul C. Lauterbur, Nobel laureate and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign chemistry professor, will be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Lauterbur was selected for his pioneering work in the development of magnetic resonance imaging, an important tool in modern medicine.

News Bureau article     
Posted February 08, 2007
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Estrogen interferes with immune surveillance in breast cancer

In a study published online in Oncogene, Dave Shapiro and collaborators from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, report "that estrogen induces the expression of an inhibitor that blocks immune cells' ability to kill tumor cells."

Research article PDF
News Bureau article     
Posted January 24, 2007
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Achievements: A report on honors, awards, appointments and other outstanding achievements of faculty and staff members

Wilfred van der Donk, affiliate of the department of biochemistry, received the 2007 Tetrahedron Young Investigator Award. He won the award in bioorganic and medicinal chemistry.

News Bureau article     
Posted January 18, 2007
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Sligar Cover Article on Lipoproteins

Stephen Sligar, Gunsalus Professor of Biochemistry and University Scholar, and collaborators in the Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology recently made the cover of The Journal of Physical Chemistry. Their article entitled, "Assembly of Lipoproteins as Imaged by Molecular Dynamics and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering" will be featured in the September 27, 2007 issue. Posted October 01, 2007
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