Histone H1 regulates gene activity throughout the cell cycle

A team of researchers, including Assistant Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology Craig Mizzen and Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology Ann Nardulli, has published a study in the Journal of Cell Biology entitled "Histone H1 phosphorylation is associated with transcription by RNA polymerases I and II."

A team of researchers, including Assistant Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology Craig Mizzen and Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology Ann Nardulli, has published a study in the Journal of Cell Biology entitled "Histone H1 phosphorylation is associated with transcription by RNA polymerases I and II."

The researchers found that the protein histone H1, known for its role in helping to compress DNA stored in the nucleus, also takes part in the formation of ribosomes, the cellular workbenches on which all proteins are made.

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July 01, 2010 All News