By trying it all, predatory sea slug learns what not to eat

Emeritus Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology Rhanor Gillette and colleagues have found that a type of predatory sea slug that usually isn’t picky when it comes to what it eats has more complex cognitive abilities than previously thought, allowing it to learn the warning cues of dangerous prey and thereby avoid them in the future. The research appears in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

Emeritus Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology Rhanor Gillette and colleagues have found that a type of predatory sea slug that usually isn’t picky when it comes to what it eats has more complex cognitive abilities than previously thought, allowing it to learn the warning cues of dangerous prey and thereby avoid them in the future. The research appears in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

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July 14, 2013 All News