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James M. Slauch

Welcome

Microbes drive all aspects of life on the planet. Finding solutions to many of our pressing global challenges, such as skyrocketing antimicrobial resistance, emergence of new infectious diseases, and the health of our planet’s ecosystems, will depend upon discoveries from basic microbiology research. The Department of Microbiology at the University of Illinois has developed and maintained the highest national and international reputation for more than 100 years. We have built upon our distinguished history (evidenced by the recent designation as a “Milestones in Microbiology” site by the American Society for Microbiology) by recruiting and retaining outstanding microbiologists who are making exciting discoveries in diverse fields while training students in cutting edge research. Our research faculty are highly productive and impactful. Nine of the eleven current senior faculty have been elected Fellows of the American Academy of Microbiology.

James M. Slauch, Head


Microbiology News

Twenty research projects are sharing slightly more than $1.4 million in funding through the Jump ARCHES research and development program to address a variety of vexing medical challenges including neurological testing for children and athletes (such as concussions), migraines, and stress among nurses enduring pandemic challenges at home and at work. The Jump ARCHES program is a partnership between OSF HealthCare and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (U of I) and its College of Medicine in Peoria (UICOMP).
Urbana, Ill. – On Sept. 17, the Cancer Center at Illinois (CCIL) and the Microbial Systems Initiative (MSI) held the Cancer and Microbes Workshop as part of a new partnership formed between the CCIL and the MSI to promote collaboration at the interface of microbial sciences and cancer research. Led by Sayee Anakk, Associate Professor of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, and Shannon Sirk, Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and Associate Director of the MSI, the “Cancer and Microbes” strategic initiative will be a part of the CCIL Cancer Discovery Platforms Bridging the Engineering-Biology Continuum (CDP) Program.
In order to cause disease, the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus must adapt to the changing host environment. Many of these adaptations are mediated through two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) that coordinate gene expression in response to environmental stimuli. In a new study reported in the Journal of Bacteriology, researchers at Illinois provide insight into the signal transduction mechanism utilized by the staphylococcal TCS ArlRS in response to host-imposed manganese and glucose starvation.
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In Memoriam

Remembering Dr. Ralph Wolfe
Remembering Dr. Abigail Salyers